There is one thing the photograph must contain, the humanity of the moment. This kind of photography is realism. But realism is not enough – there has to be vision, and the two together can make a good photograph.

– Robert Frank

It is the dualistic nature of this craft that in essence, is the fountain of youth, the holy grail we could say. When you examine Robert Frank’s quote and really dig deep within your images and ask yourselves two basic questions.

Enraptured — Nikon P7000

Nikon P700 (click to enlarge)

#1. Am I capturing the humanity of this portrait or scence?

#2. And like someone recently told me, “so what,” ask yourself, “so what.” What’s your image about, what does it say or doesn’t say. Does it have this so called “vision” as Robert Frank says. I shouldn’t have to explain what an image is about, if I do, I’ve failed a visual communicator.

This intertwined dichotomy is what Robert Frank had to do when his book he’s “The Americans” took the photography world by a storm in 1952. Fast forward to today and this is still as relevant as it was back then.

Sometimes we look at our photographs and can’t relate or we can’t see that vision with our own eyes, it happens to us all. This is not necessarily a bad or negative thing, it just simply means we’re human and sometimes we don’t have all the answers ready to go. And it is in these moments, actually a great practice, for other eyes to see those images as well. This was the case with this image. My fiancee, immediately took it upon herself to answer these two questions for me, hence the name enraptured. When I saw the final “digital print” in full screen it was all clear.

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