As photographers we’re trained to always look for the perfect exposure. Dial in your ISO, your shutter speed, get your aperture right where you want and perhaps dial in some neg exposure compensation and voila the perfect image. Not in a million years. Who wrote the “Declaration of Photography” and show me where it says the you all your images must always be perfect to be a great image.

A few moments ago, I was listening to one my favorite wedding photographers, Kevin Mullins (stay to tuned for his upcoming “Rig”) on his recent visit to the Fujifilm headquarters where he gave a presentation on his use of the Fuji X series camera and lenses. If you have not had a listen, then by all means bookmark it and listen attentively.

Kevin was talking about a quote from Don McCullin one the greatest living documentary photographers that says:

Photography for me is not looking, it’s feeling. If you can’t feel what you’re looking at, then you’re never going to get others to feel anything when they look at your pictures.

This is so true folks for documentary photography. Don’t let yourself get caught up with the perfect exposure. That perfect exposure means very little if not backed up with some emotion.

On a technical note, I just upgraded to Lightroom 5 and yes, even Photoshop CS6 and I couldn’t be happier. On a recent twitter exchange, the topic of which RAW developer app was in vogue or did the best job with the Fuji x-trans files was brought. We mentioned a couple of third party apps but for me I believe in Adobe so I’m sticking with the aformentioned apps and I’ll wait and see what’s to come in 2014. In the meantime, I’m quite happy with the results.

Gobble Gobble


All shots with the Fuji XE1 and XF 35mm